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Directorate

IW Director Michael Hüther and his team conduct research on the pressing issues of our time. This includes the issues surrounding the future shape of eurozone governance, as well as the implications of digitalization and structural change in the economy.

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In close cooperation with the staff of the German Economic Institute, the management team develops scientific publications and content on various, exciting topics. With an interdisciplinary approach, researchers draw on both theoretical models and applied empirics. Historical evidence is put to the test with modern econometric analysis tools in order to derive concrete options for action for current economic policy. In terms of content, the papers span a broad spectrum from current structural change to regulatory policy, past economic crises, and the regulation of capital markets.

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Directorate

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Michael Hüther

Prof. Dr. Michael Hüther

Director and Member of the Presidium

Tel: +49 221 4981-600

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Matthias Diermeier

Matthias Diermeier

Personal Research Assistant of the Director

Tel: +49 221 4981-605

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Markos Jung

Dr. Markos Jung

Personal Research Assistant of the Director

Tel: +49 221 4981-606

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Thomas Obst

Dr. Thomas Obst

Personal Research Assistant of the Director

Tel: +49 30 27877-135

Claudia Behrens

Claudia Behrens

Assistant to the Director

Tel: +49 221 4981 604

Simone Schüttler

Simone Schüttler

Assistant to the Director

Tel: +49 221 4981-601

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Contributions of the directorate

22 results
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The Radical Right in the European Parliament
External Publication 1. April 2021

One for One and None for All: The Radical Right in the European Parliament

Matthias Diermeier / Hannah Frohwein / Aljoscha Nau in LSE'Europe in Question' Discussion Paper Series

The radical right in Europe seemed to be on an unprecedented rise. In the run-up to the European Parliament elections in 2019, a newly founded ‘super-faction’ profoundly scared established politicians.

IW

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Conversations and Traditional Media Lead the Way
IW-Report No. 2 15. January 2021

Political Information Behavior: Conversations and Traditional Media Lead the Way

Ruth Maria Schüler / Judith Niehues / Matthias Diermeier

How Germans inform themselves about political events: Personal conversation and use of traditional media come first.

IW

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Debt Risks Along the Silk Road
External Publication 27. November 2020

The Chinese Nightmare: Debt Risks Along the Silk Road

Matthias Diermeier / Florian Güldner /Thomas Obst in In Brief

China has paid dearly for its geopolitical rise. The Corona crisis is the latest example of the risks involved with massive investment on the Silk Road. Not only are many countries caught in a Chinese debt trap, China itself needs a strategy for managing non-performing loans amid the crisis. Loan defaults on the Silk Road could jeopardise the Chinese mega-project.

IW

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Differing welfare support for natives versus immigrants
External Publication 22. July 2020

Contradictory welfare conditioning: Differing welfare support for natives versus immigrants

Matthias Diermeier / Judith Niehues / Joel Reinecke in Review of International Political Economy

The New Liberal Dilemma predicts that European universal welfare states lose support among natives due to large immigration numbers. This article contributes to the debate regarding the validity of the argument posited by the New Liberal Dilemma by examining the contradictory combination of support for a popular welfare state reform, Universal Basic Income (UBI), and conditionality for immigrants’ access to the welfare state in 20 European countries.

IW

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EU Growth Package Instead of Business Cycle Stimulus
IW-Kurzbericht No. 71 18. June 2020

EU growth package instead of business cycle stimulus

Matthias Diermeier / Florian Güldner / Markos Jung

The EU-27 suffered a hard, economic hit by the Covid-19 crisis. The EU Commission is now primarily trying to support Southern and Eastern European countries. The proposed 750 billion euro stimulus is not so much aimed at counteracting the economic corona crisis but should rather be understood as a long-term growth package – coinciding with the EU’s sluggish nature and supranational purpose.

IW

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