1. Home
  2. Studies
  3. Looking Back to the Future: Time Strata and Economic Analysis
Michael Hüther in Journal of Contextual Economics External Publication 28. May 2020 Looking Back to the Future: Time Strata and Economic Analysis

In mainstream economics cultural differences, habits and mind-sets are considered to be reflected in the institutional setting.

Download file
Time Strata and Economic Analysis
Michael Hüther in Journal of Contextual Economics External Publication 28. May 2020

Looking Back to the Future: Time Strata and Economic Analysis

Artikel in Journal of Contextual Economics

Download file

Share this article:

or copy the following link:

The link was added to your clipboard!

In mainstream economics cultural differences, habits and mind-sets are considered to be reflected in the institutional setting.

To reintroduce historical time, we combine the concept of path dependency with the concept of time strata; instead of explaining a fact isolated from its historical conditionality, the perspective moves from a contemporary phenomenon to several paths incorporated in it and questions their time-differentiated interlocking, mutual influence and conditioning. At the same time, the direction of the perspective changes: the path is analysed from today to yesterday. We use this approach to explain the particular current economic situation in Germany: namely, the strength in manufacturing and in global exports.

Download file
Time Strata and Economic Analysis
Michael Hüther in Journal of Contextual Economics External Publication 28. May 2020

Michael Hüther: Looking Back to the Future – Time Strata and Economic Analysis

Artikel in Journal of Contextual Economics

Download file

Share this article:

or copy the following link:

The link was added to your clipboard!

More on the topic

Read the article
Investment, Human Capital and Growth Effects of Public Spending
Martin Beznoska / Björn Kauder / Thomas Obst IW-Policy Paper No. 2 3. February 2021

Investment, Human Capital and Growth Effects of Public Spending

Unlike public sector consumption, public investment is often regarded as contributing to growth. Yet while spending on "intangible" goods such as education does not count as investment, even though it is potentially growth-enhancing, expenditure with little to ...

IW

Read the article
Michael Grömling in Intereconomics External Publication 21. January 2021

COVID-19 and the Growth Potential

The lasting economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic will become apparent in the development of the macroeconomic factors of production – labour, capital, human capital as well as the stock of technical knowledge.

IW

Content element with id 8880 Content element with id 9713