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Susanna Kochskämper / Silvia Neumeister / Maximilian Stockhausen IW-Trends No. 4 28. December 2020 Who Nurses When and How Much?: An Inventory of Home Nursing Care in Germany

German society is ageing and the need for nursing care is increasing. In 2017, just under 5 million people claimed to be providing nursing care in a private setting. An analysis of the data from the Socio-Economic Panel provides a heterogeneous picture of how the home care burden is shared.

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An Inventory of Home Nursing Care in Germany
Susanna Kochskämper / Silvia Neumeister / Maximilian Stockhausen IW-Trends No. 4 28. December 2020

Who Nurses When and How Much?: An Inventory of Home Nursing Care in Germany

IW-Trends

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German society is ageing and the need for nursing care is increasing. In 2017, just under 5 million people claimed to be providing nursing care in a private setting. An analysis of the data from the Socio-Economic Panel provides a heterogeneous picture of how the home care burden is shared.

Most carers are of working age and the majority are working part-time, though there are also many in fulltime jobs. However, those who are not in paid employment spend significantly longer hours nursing. More women of working age than men are looking after a relative, and on average women also spend more time nursing, although among older cohorts the difference between the sexes is less marked. While the proportion of home carers differs only slightly in relation to net income, it rises significantly with the level of net assets. However, the average number of hours of care provided is in inverse proportion to the level of net income or net assets. As the population ages, it is becoming increasingly important to adapt the conditions that our society and companies provide for home nursing accordingly. If the political objective is to enable those in need of care to remain in the home environment as long as possible, the compatibility of work and family life – and this means taking care not only of children but also of infirm relatives – must be further improved.

 

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An Inventory of Home Nursing Care in Germany
Susanna Kochskämper / Silvia Neumeister / Maximilian Stockhausen IW-Trends No. 4 28. December 2020

Susanna Kochskämper / Silvia Neumeister / Maximilian Stockhausen: Wer pflegt wann und wie viel? Eine Bestandsaufnahme zur häuslichen Pflege in Deutschland

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Measuring the solidarity principle in Germany’s statutory health insurance system
Martin Beznoska / Jochen Pimpertz / Maximilian Stockhausen IW-Analyse No. 143 13. July 2021

Would universal health insurance lead to more solidarity?

The principle behind Germany’s statutory health insurance (SHI) system, into which all employees up to a certain income threshold are obliged to pay a per¬centage of their earnings, is one of solidarity.

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Jochen Pimpertz IW-Policy Paper No. 12 26. May 2020

More government in the health care system?

Among the current challenges of the pandemic, the German health care system has so far proven to be comparatively robust. While the infection rate in Germany is so far slightly lower than in other large European economies, the relatively low mortality rate ...

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