1. Home
  2. Studies
  3. Does Online Access Promote Research in Developing Countries?
Frank Mueller-Langer / Marc Scheufen / Patrick Waelbroeck in Research Policy External Publication 18. February 2020 Does Online Access Promote Research in Developing Countries?

Universities in developing countries have rarely been able to subscribe to academic journals in the past. The “Online Access to Research in the Environment” initiative (OARE) provides institutions in developing countries with free online access to more than 11,500 environmental science journals.

to Download
Does Online Access Promote Research in Developing Countries?
Frank Mueller-Langer / Marc Scheufen / Patrick Waelbroeck in Research Policy External Publication 18. February 2020

Does Online Access Promote Research in Developing Countries?

Article in Research Policy

to Download

Share this article:

or copy the following link:

The link was added to your clipboard!

Universities in developing countries have rarely been able to subscribe to academic journals in the past. The “Online Access to Research in the Environment” initiative (OARE) provides institutions in developing countries with free online access to more than 11,500 environmental science journals.

We analyze the effect of OARE on (1) scientific output and (2) scientific input as a measure of accessibility in five developing countries. We apply difference-in-difference-in-differences estimation using a balanced panel with 249,000 observations derived from 36,202 journal articles published by authors affiliated with 2,490 research institutions. Our approach allows us to explore effects across scientific fields, i.e. OARE vs. non-OARE fields, within institutions and before and after OARE registration. Variation in online access to scientific literature is exogenous at the level of scientific fields. We provide evidence for a positive marginal effect of online access via OARE on publication output by 29.6% with confidence interval (18.5%, 40.6%) using the most conservative specification. This adds up to 2.07 additional articles due to the OARE program for an average institution publishing 7.0 articles over the observation period. Moreover, we find that OARE membership eases the access to scientific content for researchers in developing countries, leading to an increase in the number of references by 8.4% with confidence interval (5.6%, 11.2%) and the number of OARE references by 14.5% with confidence interval (7.5%, 21.5%). Our results suggest that productive institutions benefit more from OARE and that the least productive institutions barely benefit from registration.

to Download
Does Online Access Promote Research in Developing Countries?
Frank Mueller-Langer / Marc Scheufen / Patrick Waelbroeck in Research Policy External Publication 18. February 2020

Frank Mueller-Langer / Marc Scheufen / Patrick Waelbroeck: Does online access promote research in developing countries? – Empirical evidence from article-level data

Article in Research Policy

to Download

Share this article:

or copy the following link:

The link was added to your clipboard!

More on the topic

Read the article
Results of the 10th IW Survey of Further Training
Susanne Seyda IW-Trends No. 1 24. March 2021

Digital Learning Media Boost Continuing Vocational Training in Enterprises

Digitalisation is leading to an increasing need for training. Companies which have already achieved a higher level of digitalisation see a greater need for further training than their less digitalised peers and are investing correspondingly more time and money ...

IW

Read the article
Manuel Fritsch / Karl Lichtblau IW-Trends No. 1 15. March 2021

The Digital Economy in Germany

For many years now an OECD working group has been developing and coordinating an internationally comparable quantification of the economic effects of digitalization. However, the practical value of this initiative is limited by the nature of the available ...

IW

More about this topic

Content element with id 8880 Content element with id 9713