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Manuel Fritsch
IW Consult

Manuel Fritsch

Researcher of the IW Consult

Tel: +49 221 4981-728
  • Seit 2011 im IW
  • Geboren 1985 in Köln
  • Studium der Betriebswirtschaftslehre an der Universität zu Köln und der University of California, Los Angeles

IW Publications

(in cooperation with Henry Goecke, Andreas Kulpa)
Identifikation von empirischen Unternehmenscharakteristika mittels Machine Learning Verfahren
IW-Report 35/2018

(in cooperation with Berthold Busch, Michael Grömling, Karl Lichtblau, Jürgen Matthes)
Manufacturing in Europe – A growth engine in the global economy
IW-Studien, Schriften zur Wirtschaftspolitik aus dem Institut der deutschen Wirtschaft Köln, 2014

(in cooperation with Hubertus Bardt, Esther Chrischilles, Michael Grömling, Thomas Puls, Klaus-Heiner Röhl)
Zwischen Standortvorteil und Investitionsbedarf
IW-Analysen – Forschungsberichte Nr. 95, Köln 2014

Expertises

(in cooperation with David Bothe, Andrea Lövenich, Jens Perner, Thilo Schaefer)
Synthetische Energieträger – Perspektiven für die deutsche Wirtschaft und den internationalen Handel, 2017
Gutachten im Auftrag des Instituts für Wärme und Oeltechnik, Mittelständische Energiewirtschaft Deutschland e.V. und des Bundesverbandes mittelständische Mineralölunternehmen e.V.

(in cooperation with Hubertus Bardt, Roman Bertenrath, Vera Demary, Michael Grömling, Hans-Peter Klös, Galina Kolev, Rolf Kroker, Karl Lichtblau, Jürgen Matthes, Agnes Millack, Axel Plünnecke, Oliver Stettes)
Digitalisierung, Vernetzung und Strukturwandel – Wege zu mehr Wohlstand
Erster IW-Strukturbericht, 2015

(in cooperation with Hubertus Bardt, Esther Chrischilles, Michael Grömling, Thomas Puls, Klaus-Heiner Röhl)
Infrastruktur zwischen Standortvorteil und Investitionsbedarf
Gutachten 2014

More from Manuel Fritsch

Read study
Climate Protection Impact and Value-Added Effects of Ramping Up the Production of Electricity-Based Liquid Energy Carriers
Expertise 25. March 2021

Synthetic fuels: potential for Europe

Manuel Fritsch / Thomas Puls / Thilo Schaefer

Synthetic fuels produced from green electricity can make a major contribution to reducing greenhouse gas emissions around the world. Liquid energy carriers produced from renewably generated electricity can be used in combustion engines without impacting the climate.

IW

Read study
Limits of Data Availability and First Estimates
IW-Trends No. 1 15. March 2021

The Digital Economy in Germany

Manuel Fritsch / Karl Lichtblau

For many years now an OECD working group has been developing and coordinating an internationally comparable quantification of the economic effects of digitalization. However, the practical value of this initiative is limited by the nature of the available data.

IW

Read study
Data Availability and Initial Estimates
Expertise 15. March 2021

The Digital Economy in Germany: Data Availability and Initial Estimates

Manuel Fritsch / Karl Lichtblau

In a satellite account, a specific horizontal area of the economy is extracted from the System of National Accounts (SNA) and modelled as a separate product or industry group (satellite). The term “satellite” refers to the chosen subsets of sectors or economic activities in that system.

IW

Read study
The Importance of the Automotive Industry for Germany
IW-Report No. 43 7. September 2020

The importance of the automotive industry for Germany

Thomas Puls / Manuel Fritsch

The German automotive industry can now look back on a golden decade. Between 2008 and 2018 its businesses reached numerous record peaks in sales. The main driver was the strong market growth in China.

IW

Read study
How Data-Driven are Business Models in Germany?
IW-Report No. 9 11. March 2020

How Data-Driven are Business Models in Germany?

Manuel Fritsch / Alevtina Krotova

Data is rapidly becoming one of the most important business resources. A growing number of companies address the question of how they can use data profitably in their business.

IW

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An important contribution to economic and social cohesion
Expertise 12. June 2019

Cross border services in the internal market: An important contribution to economic and social cohesion

Manuel Fritsch / Roman Bertenrath

Over the years, European value chains have become increasingly relevant to employment in the EU. While research on industrial value chains is broadly covered in recent years, the effects of valuechains in European service sectors still needs to be quantified.

IW

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Factory Europe and its Ties in Global Value Chains
Expertise 1. December 2017

Factory Europe and its Ties in Global Value Chains

Manuel Fritsch / Jürgen Matthes

Global value chains have continued to expand over the last few decades. This has made them a central part of many companies’ internationalization strategies and an important facet of globalization.

IW

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EU Partners benefit from Germany's US export success
IW-Kurzbericht 5. October 2017

EU Partners benefit from Germany's US export success

Manuel Fritsch / Galina Kolev / Jürgen Matthes

In the debate of the US current account deficit, Donald Trump focuses his criticism to a large extent on Germany. But in the case of a trade war it would not affect Germany alone. Due to intermediate input linkages, hundreds of thousands of jobs in the EU partner countries depend on the success of German exports to the US.

IW

Read study
Manufacturing in Europe
IW-Studie 15. January 2015

Manufacturing in Europe

Institut der deutschen Wirtschaft Köln / Institut der deutschen Wirtschaft Köln Consult

A growth engine in the global economy

IW

Read study
Industry as a growth engine in the global economy
Expertise 28. January 2014

Industry as a growth engine in the global economy

Karl Lichtblau / Jürgen Matthes / Manuel Fritsch / Roman Bertenrath / Michael Grömling / Berthold Busch

Industry is the backbone of the economy. Due to strong spillover effects to other sectors, manufacturing is significantly more important to the overall economy than it is often given credit for. The following findings vividly illustrate the relevance of industry in various dimensions.Industry features as an economic hub to the economy because it offers an important market for suppliers from other sectors. The function of industry as a hub for the economy is underlined by the fact that the manufacturing sector accounts for 49 per cent of intermediate input transactions in the EU economy, while its share in total value added (VA) and employment amounts to 15 and 14 per cent, respectively. Business services as well as other non-industry sectors strongly benefit from industry.s demands in the course of upstream and downstream value chains. In fact, for every one euro of manufacturing output in the EU, 34 cents of input comes from other supply sectors. The symbiosis of industry and other sectors on the input level can be termed “Joint Production”. This deep and mutually productive integration, particularly with the service sector, renders the traditional dichotomy and antagonism between industry and services obsolete. Combined with this “Joint Production”, the relevance of industry is considerably higher than it is often given credit for. In the EU, this “Combined Sector” accounts for 24.3 per cent of VA in the total economy compared to a world average of 20.8 per cent. Furthermore, the share of the “Combined Sector” remained more or less constant between 2005 and 2011 in the EU. In Europe in particular, the manufacturing sector is a major hub for the organisation of value chains. While “Joint Production” accounts for only 3.7 per cent of total VA in the world on average, its share in the EU is considerably higher at 8.5 per cent. Due to this interconnectedness, industry generates strong positive spillovers to other sectors. Industry exerts higher multiplier effects on the total economy than other sectors. In fact, every unit of additional demand in the manufacturing sector generates 1.68 units of additional output in the total economy. Regarding employment, while manufacturing directly provides 32 million jobs in the EU, more than 20 million jobs indirectly depend on industry in related supply sectors. Thus, a vibrant and thriving industry in Europe will also benefit the economy overall. Industry fosters important growth factors. Manufacturing businesses account for a significant share of research. With a share of 15 per cent of VA in the total economy, industry is responsible for 65 per cent of research and technological development (R&D) expenditure and for 49 per cent of innovation expenditure. Large manufacturing firms. innovation intensity is twice as high as in large companies in other sectors. Industry relies heavily on employees with STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) skills. These qualifications are considered particularly important when it comes to innovative capacity required to develop more efficient production processes. Moreover, STEM skills and practical experience are necessary throughout manufacturing firms to generate new, better and more marketable products. Industrial businesses are a motor for internationalisation. In the EU, they are responsible for 76 per cent of merchandise exports and 57 per cent of total exports (including service exports). In addition, the EU boasts a world export market share in manufacturing of 42 per cent. EU industry is strongly integrated into global value chains (GVCs) with particularly intense cross-border intermediate linkages among EU countries. The above factors enable the manufacturing sector to be more productive than other sectors. In industry, an hour of work generates nearly €32 of VA, a productivity level that is about 15 per cent higher than the average in all sectors. As a result, manufacturing provides a large number of high-quality jobs that offer higher wages and better income prospects than many other sectors. While industry concentrates on employees who have completed secondary education, industrial wages are above average in every skill class. Industry is a growth driver. Considering the relevance of industry for the above-mentioned growth drivers, it comes as no surprise that a strong industrial base goes hand in hand with higher economic growth and technical progress. In countries with an above-average specialisation in industry,5 the growth of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has been stronger since 2000 (+149 per cent on average in euro terms) than in the comparison group of countries with below-average specialisation (+35 per cent on average). The same is true for the European Union but at a lower level: the industry-oriented Member States6 grow by 43 per cent, the comparison group by 38 per cent. Moreover, when the industry share (in the total economy VA) increases by one percentage point, total factor productivity (a measure for technical progress) rises on average by 0.28 per cent. Due to these beneficial spillover effects, a renaissance of industry would also have an important social dimension: it can help Europe to get out of the current crisis and reduce the burden of excessive unemployment in many parts of the EU.Apart from this outstanding macroeconomic relevance, industry offers solutions to societal challenges. The innovative and creative capacities of manufacturing businesses are essential to tackle many future challenges, e.g. population growth in emerging economies or dwindling natural resources.

IW

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