This paper presents and critically evaluates the bank capital requirement rules proposed by the European Union – the capital requirements directive CRD IV and the capital requirements regulation CRR. First, the rules of the Basel III accord about equity capital standards of banks are briefly described. Second, the EU proposal based on Basel III is presented. The article differentiates between rules fully in line with Basel III, modified rules, and new rules not covered by Basel III. Third, the EU proposals are critically evaluated. The paper concludes that the proposals lead in the right direction, but there is still much room for improvement. In fact, some of the planned rules should be urgently revised. Above all, risk weights for member state government bonds must be introduced, liquidity requirements should not overly favour government bonds, and member states should be able to set capital requirements which are greater than 18% of risk-weighted assets.

IW policy paper

Felix Kövener / Jürgen Matthes / Thomas Schuster: New Bank Equity Capital Rules in the European Union – A Critical Evaluation

IconDownload | PDF

Ansprechpartner

The Case for Reviving Securitization
IW-Kurzbericht, 26. September 2016

Markus Demary The Case for Reviving SecuritizationArrow

European financial markets are still fragmented. A lack of cross-border lending and cross-border asset holdings hinders the financing of the economy, the conduct of monetary policy as well as cross-border risk-sharing against asymmetric shocks. Reviving the market for securitizations is vital for achieving these goals. A true European Capital Markets Union is needed, but there are still a lot of obstacles to overcome. mehr

Why the ECB is not to blame for low interest rates
Gastbeitrag, 15. September 2016

Markus Demary auf EUROPP Why the ECB is not to blame for low interest ratesArrow

In the latest set of EU stress tests, several German lenders performed poorly. As Markus Demary writes in EUROPP (Blog of LSE about European Politics and Policy), some of this performance has been blamed on low interest rates squeezing the profitability of lenders. He argues that while the ECB has frequently been blamed for this situation, the reality is more complex and instead reflects long-term trends which can only be addressed by lasting structural reforms. mehr